Password breach was the most talked about topic in the internet security arena in June. The hysteria began when a user on a Russian forum claimed that he gained access to 6.5 million passwords to the professional networking site, LinkedIn. And as the week went on, the scope of the leak grew significantly to affect both eHarmony and Last.fm.


As the start of the Summer Olympics in London nears, consumers need to be on the lookout for malware creators and scammers trying to make a quick buck off of the festivities, reports Naked Security.


On 28th May 2012, Iran National CERT published a report describing a new and complex threat dubbed “Flame”. The program is being used for targeted cyber espionage in Middle Eastern countries. The report linked this newly discovered threat with the notorious Stuxnet and Duqu attacks.


According to the largest study of password security ever conducted, people over the age of 55 pick passwords double the strength of those chosen by people under 25 years old. It also found that most of us choose passwords that are less secure than security experts recommend.


Adobe have published a security update addressing a critical vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.235 and earlier versions.

The vulnerability could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.

Windows users of Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.235 and earlier are advised to upgrade to Adobe Flash Player 11.3.300.257


eHarmony Passwords Stolen

by Andy on June 7th, 2012 in Security Alert.

Hot on the heels of the LinkedIn password breach, dating site, eHarmony have reported that "a small fraction" (about 1.5 million) of their user base have also been affected. Like LinkedIn, eHarmony have reset the compromised account's passwords and will send out notification explaining how to reset them. Probably a good time to change your password - check the best practices in the LinkedIn post from earlier today.


LinkedIn have confirmed that a number of user accounts have been compromised. While they have not published the amount of compromised accounts, a Russian forum user uploaded around 6.5 million encrypted user passwords to demonstrate the security breach took place. While the user names have not been included, it's a pretty good bet that they have also been stolen. You can check this site to see if your password was amongst those stolen.